Language Arts

Passage of the Week
Josie and Franklin had heard Gramma's stories many times, but they never got tired of them. There was something so comforting about Gramma's voice. Josie felt as if she were being wrapped in a warm, fuzzy blanket when she listened to Gramma's stories. And even though Franklin was 14 going on 15, he still liked to hear Gramma's stories about her life in the South.
Now Franklin got up from the step where he had been sitting. "Gramma, I have to go do my math homework. I'll see you at dinner."
Josie stayed where she was. Like Gramma, Josie loved nature, but living in the city didn't provide much. She looked around the neighborhood. Outside their second-floor apartment, Gramma had planted window boxes, bright with red and white geraniums. Other than that, a few spindly trees that grew between the sidewalk and the curb were the only green, growing things that Josie could see.
Other neighbors were sitting on their front stoops, too, hoping for a cool evening breeze. – MacMillan/McGraw Hill, Treasures Practice Book, page 13

Directions:

Read the passage above out loud. Then, play the audio and compare. Keep reading until you can read the passage fluently. There are 167 words in the passage. How long does it take you to read them all?

Word Study and Pronunciation Practice

Hard and Soft “g”

A hard “g” is found in words like garden and and gaze
A soft “g” sounds like a “j”. You’ll find it in words like orange and geology.


How do you know when a word has a hard or soft sound? The “g” will have a soft sound when the “g” is followed by an “e”, “i”, or “y.” Check the pronunciation of the following words.

grumble

age

gerbil

gel

gamble

rectangular

Magellan

Hard and Soft “c”

A hard “c” sounds like a “k.” You’ll find it in words like cactus and cube. A soft “c” sounds like an “s.” You’ll find this sound in words like prince and fierce.


How do you know when a word has a hard or soft sound? The “c” will have a soft sound when the “c” is followed by an “e”, “i”, or “y.” Check the pronunciation of the following words.

cider

slice

ceremony

culture

principal

include

Word of the Week

Confound

Word Roots

Practice More Vocabulary Here

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